A Kentucky man who allegedly tackled his neighbor, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, in a dispute over their adjacent yards has been charged with assaulting a member of Congress resulting in personal injury, a felony under federal law.

The U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Indiana announced the charge brought against Bowling Green, Ky., resident Rene A. Boucher.

The 59-year old Boucher has agreed to plead guilty to the federal charge.

In 1971, Winnette Willis was a 23-year-old single mom in Chicago when she became pregnant again. "I was terrified of having another child," she tells Radio Diaries.

Before the Supreme Court's decision in Roe v. Wade 45 years ago, abortion was illegal in most of the United States, including in Illinois.

Women like Willis who wanted to terminate their pregnancies had limited and often frightening options. She wasn't sure what to do. And then one day, while she was waiting on an L train platform, she saw a sign.

The Department of Justice intends to retry Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., and Salomon Melgen, after a federal judge declared a mistrial in the bribery and fraud case.

The notice, filed Friday, was brief and requested a retrial "at the earliest possible date."

"The decision to retry this case was made based on the facts and the law, following a careful review," the department explained in a statement. "The conduct alleged in the indictment is serious and warrants retrial before a jury of citizens in the District of New Jersey."

Almost a year after President Trump tried to bar travelers from some predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States, the Supreme Court announced Friday that it will consider a legal challenge to the third version of that ban.

Facebook is rolling out a major change to its News Feed: pushing up news articles that come from "high quality" sources, and pushing down the others. The move signals that, in an effort to combat the problem of fake news, the social media giant is willing to play a kind of editorial role — making decisions based on substance, not just how viral a headline may be.

CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a post to his Facebook page:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's been quite a news week, even by recent standards.

The U.S. is potentially hours away from a partial government shutdown. The debate rages on over the president's reported comments about not wanting to accept immigrants from "s**thole countries." "Girtherism" has erupted over the president's latest height and weight measurements. Officials are scrambling to figure out how to avoid another false ballistic missile alarm, like the one residents of Hawaii suffered last weekend.

The Hotel California was, according to a case filed against it by legendary rock band The Eagles, living it up a little too much. The rock band sued the Mexico-based hotel, which shares a name with the band's iconic 1976 song, resulting in a settlement Thursday. The settlement's terms were not disclosed.

Jurors in eastern Canada on Friday found three men not guilty of criminal negligence following an oil train disaster that left 47 people dead. The accident in July 2013 involved a U.S.-owned train carrying North Dakota crude oil. In the aftermath, regulators in the U.S. and Canada adopted sweeping reforms to the way railroads haul and manage hazardous cargoes.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

01/19/2018: All about bonds

8 hours ago

(Markets Edition) A lack of enthusiasm for older, lower interest rates is pushing bond yields up to their highest point in years. Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial, joined us to give us some perspective on what's happening. Next, we're looking at another type of bond: the one you pay to get out of jail. One group is seeking to bond 160,000 out of jail in dozens of U.S. cities over the next several years. 

How the potential government shutdown could affect you

8 hours ago

The House of Representatives has passed a bill to temporarily keep the government funded. But to keep it from shutting down just after midnight tonight, the Senate would have to pass its funding extension and, as you've been hearing, the votes may not be there.

One key issue they're fighting over is DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Democrats want protections for people who arrived in the U.S. as undocumented immigrant children.

New figures show Venezuela’s oil output plummeted again last year, continuing a years-long streak of falling production. What will it mean for the economy as inflation soars and quality of life for residents declines? Rice University’s Francisco Monaldi explains why he calls the trend a “death spiral” for the country’s oil industry.

Click the above audio player to hear the full interview.

Why most employees still won’t report sexual harassment

11 hours ago

Despite the growing number of women speaking out publicly about sexual harassment in the workplace, a recent survey found that in many cases, employees who were sexually harassed never reported it to management, in fear of being labeled a “troublemaker.”

“Others said it was their word against the other person’s. Or, they’re afraid of losing their job,” said Ladan Nikravan Hayes, a career advisor at CareerBuilder, the company behind the survey.

In the fight against bail, a new group brings resources

11 hours ago

When somebody gets arrested, having a few hundred dollars in a bank account can mean the difference between sleeping at home and spending time in jail. But that’s not an easy proposition for people struggling to make ends meet.

Take Jasmine Borden. She was arrested in May 2017 on charges of child endangerment and leaving the scene of an accident. She is still awaiting trial in that case, but she spent a little over two months at the St. Louis Medium Security Institution before several community organizations raised $500 to bail her out.

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