This story of a man who nearly died in the hospital actually started in the woods of Washington's Cascade Mountains last summer.

"I was cutting for a logging outfit up on these rock cliffs and I felled a 150-foot fir tree into [some] maple trees," says Kristopher Kelly, a 51-year-old lumberjack. The maples "had a bunch of dead tops — they call 'em widow makers," Kelly says. "You don't want to get under them because they'll make you a widow."

If the answer is, "This longtime Jeopardy! host has been chosen to moderate a Pennsylvania gubernatorial debate this fall," then the question is "Who is Alex Trebek?"

Why didn't then-President Barack Obama stop Russia's campaign of active measures against the 2016 presidential campaign?

USC Law School's Pro Bono program provides student volunteers for legal services throughout South Carolina.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

It’s tax season, and many people are working with tax preparers.  But some preparers are giving away their services for free to elderly or low income clients.  They’re tax law students in the Pro Bono program at the University of South Carolina School of Law.  The Pro Bono program provides volunteer services to many causes year round: clerks for pro bono lawyers, research, wills and other areas of the law. 

Critics tend to judge Olympics coverage by a few key metrics: How many mistakes did the commentators make, and how many people are actually watching the Games in prime time?

When it comes to NBC's coverage of the Winter Olympics, the first category has a couple of doozies – including the network declaring a winner of the women's super-G Alpine skiing event before all the competitors had skied, including the actual winner.

As high school students who survived the shooting in Parkland, Fla., travel to the state Capitol to demand action on guns, lawmakers offered a glimpse of the battle they face.

In Tuesday's session, which opened with prayer for the community of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 students and staff were killed last week, Florida House lawmakers declined to open debate on a bill that would ban assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines.

Arizona farmer Terry Button grew up eating beans in New England.

"I never sit down to eat a little portion of beans," he said, grinning. "I eat a big bowl of beans."

They were his favorite food — baked beans, great northern beans, navy beans, lima beans mixed with corn in succotash.

"But we didn't have tepary beans," Button said. "Never saw a tepary bean until I got here, and they became my favorite bean."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

As evening settled over eastern Ghouta on Tuesday, the suburb just outside Damascus lay battered by 48 hours of sustained airstrikes. And the approaching night promised still more horror for one hospital.

By 5 p.m. local time, the Syrian American Medical Society says, barrel bombs had begun to fall in a downpour about the medical facility.

Pages

News and Features from APM and PRI

(Markets Edition) The group at the Federal Reserve that makes key decisions about interest rates is getting ready to release minutes from its latest meeting. We'll talk with Susan Schmidt — senior vice president at Westwood Holdings Group — about some of the factors that may influence them. Next, we'll look at how Texas funds its higher education system, and then discuss the harsh conditions that builders have to face in the winter.

Texas legislature taking on college costs

3 hours ago

A panel of Texas lawmakers meets Wednesday to take a look at how the state funds higher education each year. Legislatures across the country — who all face rising costs of higher ed and are trying to contain tuition hikes — will be watching for portable solutions that might work in other states.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

For people who work indoors, snow, ice, and subfreezing temperatures are often nothing more than an inconvenience. But for construction companies and their employees, harsh winter weather can be something more — a financial and physical hazard.

Cities across the country — from large urban areas like Chicago to smaller ones like Cleveland — are in the midst of a multiyear building boom, with developers racing to meet pent-up demand for housing and office space. And with billions of dollars in play and deadlines to meet, the work rarely stops even when the weather turns ice cold.

02/21/2018: Parkland, Florida students mobilize

6 hours ago

(U.S. Edition) A group of survivors from the Parkland, Florida mass shooting last week are lobbying for gun control laws, and they're getting a lot of financial support. We'll take a look at some of the steps they've taken to mobilize, along with some of the donors who are supporting the cause. Afterwards, we'll examine the criteria Texas uses to fund its colleges and universities, and then we'll talk to Marketplace regular Allan Sloan about why he thinks there was that big drop in markets earlier this month. 

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … The world’s biggest mining companies are seeing a boost to their bottom lines thanks to rising global commodity prices. We’ll tell you how the battery revolution is helping shape the overall market. Then, India is opening up its coal industry, allowing foreign companies to bid for coal mines in the country. But will more investment from some of the world’s biggest companies translate into better quality of life for residents there? Afterward, a conversation about whether growing use of artificial intelligence presents a looming danger. 

More...

Piano Jazz

Jazz legend Marian McPartland hosted Piano Jazz for over 30 years. The show continues showcasing the top musicians of all time with broadcasts and podcasts from the archives.

Your donation makes a real difference.

Reaching for the goal by midnight! Make your donation now to support your favorite programs.

Every musician has to start somewhere!

Start by entering the @nprmusic #TinyDeskContest between Feb 20 - Mar 25.

From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

Get weekly program highlights via e-mail.

South Carolina Military and Veterans

Stories about South Carolina veterans, the history of the conflicts in which they served, and those on the home front.

How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

Recovery

Stories of people and communities going about the work of recovery from the floods of 2015.