The world's population growth is slowing, according to a new United Nations report, but the number of people living on Earth will still approach 10 billion by the year 2050.

The document tallies the current population at 7.6 billion people, up from 7.4 billion just two years ago.

Renee Rabinowitz, a Holocaust survivor in her 80s, was flying from Newark, N.J., to Tel Aviv in 2015, when a flight attendant on Israel's El Al airline asked if she would be willing to change seats. An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man had said he did he not feel comfortable sitting next to her.

Rabinowitz agreed to move. But afterward, she said she felt "deep humiliation" — and sued the airline in Israeli court.

Jerusalem's Magistrate Court ruled Thursday in her favor, saying that asking her to change seats based on her gender was discrimination.

Six inmates at Georgia's Polk County Jail came to the aid of a deputy sheriff who collapsed on the job, calling 911 with his phone and staying with him as the ambulance arrived.

The inmates were on their weekly work detail on June 12, sprucing up a Polk County cemetery ahead of Father's Day, when the deputy collapsed, WXIA in Atlanta reports.

"I happened to look up and I seen the officer, he was going to his knees," one inmate tells WXIA.

Two government watchdog groups, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington and the National Security Archive, filed a lawsuit Thursday against President Trump and the Executive Office of the President.

A federal appeals court has upheld a lower court ruling that the confession of Brendan Dassey, whose case was part of the Netflix documentary series Making a Murderer, was involuntary. Dassey was found guilty of helping his uncle kill a young woman in 2005, and has been held in a Wisconsin prison.

OB-GYNs Give Women More Say In When They Have Mammograms

7 hours ago

Women in their 40s at average risk for breast cancer should talk to their health care provider about the risks and benefits of mammography before starting regular screening at that age, according to guidelines released Thursday by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Throngs of mourners paid their final respects to Otto Warmbier Thursday at a public funeral at the high school he attended near Cincinnati. Just four years ago, Warmbier graduated from the school as the salutatorian.

The 22-year-old University of Virginia student was detained in North Korea for 17 months and died on Monday, shortly after he returned to the United States in a coma.

Federal regulators on Thursday said they've identified "the perpetrator of one of the largest ... illegal robocalling campaigns" they have ever investigated.

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed a $120 million fine for a Miami resident said to be single-handedly responsible for almost 97 million robocalls over just the last three months of 2016.

Officials say Adrian Abramovich auto-dialed hundreds of millions of phone calls to landlines and cellphones in the U.S. and Canada and at one point even overwhelmed an emergency medical paging service.

In this week's episode of the show and podcast Invisibilia, we explore what happens when you discover a part of yourself that is very different than who you think you are.

A Slow And Steady Approach To Chemotherapy

8 hours ago

When doctors treat cancer with chemotherapy, they usually attack the tumor as aggressively as the patient can bear. Then, after a break, they do it again. And again.

But that hard-hitting chemo tactic can have a downside: a few resistant cancer cells may survive, and the cancer can come back.

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South Carolina News

Artist Peter Lenzo with a collection of his sculpture at his home in Columbia, SC.
Makayla Gay / South Carolina Public Radio

South Carolina artist Peter Lenzo creates masterful sculpture that has gained the attention of collectors from across the country. His work draws inspiration from the traditionally African American art of face jugs and is currently on display at Columbia's If Art Gallery.

Charleston Forum Commemorates the Emanuel 9

Jun 20, 2017
A panel discussion at the Charleston Forum on Race on Friday, June 16, 2017.
Tara Spurling Photography

On the night before the second Anniversary of the June 15, 2015 mass shooting that took the lives of nine worshippers at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, Reverend Eric Manning led the opening prayer at the Charleston Forum on Race. The forum is part of a series of events this month to commemorate the Emanuel 9 and to honor those who survived. In addition to remembering those who died, panel members discussed issues brought to greater attention because of the tragedy. South Carolina Public Radio's Laura Hunsberger has more on the story.

Laura Wright of Saluda (right), just turned 111 years old.  Her "baby sister," Annie Belle Chappelle, is 96.
Tut Underwood/ SC Public Radio

Laura Wright of Saluda recently celebrated her 111th birthday.  Friends and relatives, including her 96-year-old "baby sister," gathered to pay tribute to her long and well-lived life.  A teacher for decades, Wright said her parents prepared and encouraged her and her siblings to get an education and contribute to society.   Her friend Costena Kelly cited "Miss Laura" as a role model, saying "She always said 'be a lady.

Joseph Rackers and Marina Lomazov
Courtesy of the Artists

This week an internationally-acclaimed music event takes place in Columbia: The Southeastern Piano Festival, created and produced by University of South Carolina music professors Joseph Rackers and Marina Lomazov.  Though its name sounds regional, in reality it draws high school applicants and world-class judge/performers from all across the United States and beyond.  The producers tell us how they conceived the festival 15 years ago, and what attracts the finest applicants to vie for the 20 spots that the competition accepts.

Jesse Colin Young still tours and records music, but a half-century after the Summer of Love, he's still proud of the Youngbloods anthem of peace, "Get Together."
Tut Underwood/SC Public Radio

June 1967 heralded the Summer of Love, when tens of thousands of America’s young people headed to San Francisco with flowers in their hair. The Monterrey Pop Festival was the first major rock event of its kind, and brought wider attention to emerging artists such as The Who, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Big Brother and the Holding Company, with its electrifying singer, Janis Joplin. USC historian Lauren Sklaroff says San Francisco had long been a place where people who felt like outsiders could gather with others like themselves.

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From books to barbecue, from current events to colonial history, Walter Edgar's Journal delves into the arts, culture, history of South Carolina and the American South.
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