This Week on The South Carolina Lede

Palmetto Spotlight - Deadly Prison Fights And Nikki Haley's Bite. Gavin Jackson; Meg Kinnard, S.C. reporter for The A.P., and Jamie Lovegrove, from The Post and Courier.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has ordered the expulsion of a 71-year-old Australian nun, giving her 30 days to leave the country after she reportedly joined protest rallies against his government.

Sister Patricia Fox, who has lived in the Philippines for nearly three decades, has had her missionary visa revoked after apparently speaking out against Duterte at demonstrations in southern Davao City.

She has been labeled an "undesirable" foreigner for what the country's Bureau of Immigration says is "her involvement in partisan political activities."

A federal judge has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to end deportation protections for some young immigrants, saying the White House was "arbitrary and capricious" in moving to end the Obama-era DACA program.

In a blow to President Trump, who has long railed against the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates for the District of Columbia said the Department of Homeland Security had failed to provide an adequate rationale for why the program is unlawful.

Over the course of 15 years, the U.S. has contributed more than $3 billion into a trust fund that is aimed at helping Afghanistan with its reconstruction.

In total, donors from around the world have given the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund, which is administered by the World Bank, more than $10 billion.

But according to a watchdog appointed by Congress, those billions of dollars are at risk because the World Bank and the government of Afghanistan are not adequately monitoring where they go and how they are used.

There's arguably nothing grander in the nation's capital than a state dinner.

The red carpet gets rolled out, the silverware is shined, and the coveted guest list is winnowed down.

At the New York City cell phone shop where he does his homework, nine-year-old Ahmed Alhuthaifi says he misses his mom a lot.

"Sometimes, I feel like I am going to cry," he says. "Trump won't let her in."

After a years-long effort, his mother, who is stuck in Saudi Arabia, was denied a visa due to President Trump's restrictions on immigration and travel from certain countries, including Yemen. She and Ahmed's four younger siblings, who live with her, missed Ahmed's birthday celebrations on April 3.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Avengers: Infinity War is — and truly feels like — the culmination of something.

Updated at 11:25 p.m. ET

Two police officers were shot and critically wounded Tuesday at a Dallas Home Depot, along with a civilian whose condition has not been given. After an hourslong manhunt, Dallas police announced that a suspect had been been arrested after a high-speed chase.

Police Chief Reneé Hall told reporters at a late night news conference that the two police officers and a civilian were out of surgery. She declined to give their names or more details about their condition.

Updated at 8:02 p.m. ET

Prosecutors told the jury in Bill Cosby's criminal retrial that the legendary funnyman on The Cosby Show stands in glaring contrast to the sexual predator who victimized Andrea Constand.

And Cosby's chief accuser was not his sole target, prosecutor Kristen Feden said in her closing argument, describing how scores of other women have accused Cosby of trading on his celebrity status over decades to sexually prey on them.

Allan Monga, a junior at Deering High School in Portland, Maine, traveled to Washington, D.C. to compete in the Poetry Out Loud contest on Monday. It's a national competition in which students recite great works of poetry, and it's run by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation.

But Monga, who says he fled violence in his home country of Zambia, was initially barred from the national final because of his immigration status: He's an asylum seeker and does not yet have U.S. citizenship.

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News and Features from APM and PRI

When you’ve got a little extra money to work with — or a lot — what do you do with it? Maybe you stuff it under the mattress. Maybe you try to invest it and put it to work. Or maybe you spend it on yourself and some important people in your life. That last option is what many American companies seem to be doing with their cash hoards these days:returning it to investors via stock buybacks and dividends. What else could that money be doing?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

EU is unhappy with U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs

6 hours ago

When the United States imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum imports last month, the European Union and a handful of other key allies got a temporarily exemption that expires next week. China was not granted an exemption and took its case to the World Trade Organization. This week, the EU has decided to join that complaint, as have Russia, India and others.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Advertisers are not leaving Facebook any time soon

7 hours ago

Ads and consumer data are Facebook's financial lifeblood. Yet, after all of the recent controversies  and #deletefacebook campaigns, are advertisers concerned that users will abandon the platform for greener — and more reputable — pastures?

President Donald Trump’s nominee for secretary of state took a big step closer to confirmation on Monday night. In a surprise vote, a key Senate committee approved the nomination of CIA director Mike Pompeo for the job. Pompeo is expected to face a vote in the full Senate later this week. One lawmaker who voted "no" is Robert Menendez of New Jersey, the top Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee.

Menendez spoke with The World’s Marco Werman and the following is a transcript of the full interview.

60: "The great lie at the heart of the criminal justice system"

8 hours ago

When Robin Steinberg and David Feige were public defenders in New York, they saw thousands of clients — often poor people of color — stuck in jail because they couldn't make bail for minor offenses. They started the Bronx Freedom Fund to pay that bail and help people stay in their jobs and with their families while awaiting their day in court. Now they're going national with The Bail Project. We talked with the husband-and-wife team about the economics of criminal justice reform. First though, this week's news fixations: the bond market and (yes, more!) privacy on Facebook.

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South Carolina Military and Veterans

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On The South Carolina Business Review, Mike Switzer, focuses on news from the state's business community with interviews of small business owners and business leaders …

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How did the piano get its name? Why can’t you "reach" a crescendo? Who invented opera—and why? Answers to countless classical music questions from Miles Hoffman.

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